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is saying. do you see politics in america moving towards the david roeder changing of the guard philosophy class. .. >> it is affecting people's attitus as they enter the political process, and i believe at this point, the democrats believe that that will work to their advantage, but as i said, these things are organic, and just as bill clinton kind of rethought and redefined the democratic party after three consecutive losses during the reagan and first bush presidencies, there may be a republican on the horizon who will similarly do that and be able to capture the imagination of his or her party, and then win in the national election. it's what keeps people like me going. [laughter] [applause] >> thank you, all, very much. [applause] >> up next on booktv, arguing the american media aided in the re-election of president barack obama saying the media was consistently critical of the republican party and the nominee, mitt romney, while negligent to do the same with barack obama. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you, john, and my thanks to the harming foundation for inviting me.
contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we will delve deeper into that. what i want to give him a couple of minutes at a moderate is framing a li
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
governor in america today. two plus two with a challenge from this man we all know about that rock and would be making it 82. when his parents were on vacation the one that the painted over because they found it offensive. a little bit of racism going on there. they don't like him and she's given an interview to a network to say it's. there is a stop the press story for you. rick santorum. ladies and gentlemen did we know who karen santorum was beating before she ever met rick -- dating before she ever met racket and more importantly did the children need to hear these stories? did have any bearing on the presidential race other than to smear rick and karen santorum? mitt goes a long do this is a delicious apples to apples comparison. mitt has a 5,400 word essay for devoted to him in the washington post. in that essay we learn stop the press seeing 15 he cut some boys here and we learned at the same data barack obama switched his position on the rights and the boy allegedly was a homosexual. the story isn't switching his position. the point is that we have to cover that was a homop
of patients using drivingy rooms in america are utilization. at the medicaid -- you leave a message no one calls you back. there are no appointment available. that's before the expansion. it's going get even worse as time goes forward. it's mapping out the claims on a map five years of data mapping out the home address of every resident and this is only nine square miles a small community. 6% of the city blocks are 10% of the line mass, 18% of the patients, 27% of the visits and 37% of the cost. it's just theroom room and hospital care. all over america they are living collected in buildings. many of which you are funding through state funds and federal funds. these are the two most expensive in the city. these are beautiful buildings with great management. 600 parents who are mostly dual eligible. these are disabled seniorsed at $12 million in payment for the care to go bark over and over to the hospital. the building at the bottom. 300 patients a nursing home 300 patients had 15 million in payment to got hospital. we have mapped out data all over the cub now and found the same pattern
the face of gun violence in america as horrific as sandy hook was is not some suburban kid, it's a brown or black kid in the ghetto. if you look at chicago, chicago's on track for two sandy hooks per month. usually against another black person. yet chicago is about a third, a third and a third black, white and hispanic. why would so many murders come from the black community? the answer is so many kids come from parents without fathers. you look at violation, we're talking about gang-related kids, usually young kids. there was a documentary that my dad and i discussed in the book called resurrection, and it was about truth pack shakur. tupac shakur. and he said white people may like hearing me say this, but i know for a fact if i'd had a father in my life, i would have had discipline and confidence. and he went on to talk about the facth joid a did a father, he wanted structure, he wanted protection. and he went on to say in a way maybe a conservative right-winger might say that it is important for a boy to have a father in his life. a boy needs a father. tupac shakur said this. there's
constituents during a town hall meeting in oklahoma. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: walt mossberg, has technology plateaued? >> guest: oh, no, absolutely not. absolutely not. technology is always changing and always coming up with -- technology companies are always coming up with something new, and there are new technology companies all the time incubating, a lot of them are in what we call stealth mode. we don't even know who they are. certain technologies plateau and things move on, but in general, no. not at all. >> host: i guess i ask that because the last couple years we've had the explosion of smartphones, we've had tablets come online. what's out there? >> guest: well, first of all, there are vast numbers of people especially in the less developed cups, but even in the developed countries who don't own a smartphone and, certainly, there are vast thurms that don't own -- numbers that don't own a tablet. to give you a rough example, apple -- which leads in the tablet market -- has sold som
's religions utile flowers from the same garden. i was at a gathering of evangelicals around america. and this includes clerics from the muslim world. an improbable gathering. for three days people worked and struggled with the effort to find the common ground. in fact between all the religions and philosophy. whether a new order confucianism or any of the other different approaches this is tied together. by the golden rule. and they all come from the same human heart. leaders and citizens, particularly people in public life, everyone talks about how we draw strength from the example of our faith-based communities. but not enough people actually translate those words into actions or policies or life philosophies. so i think that whether it's teachers are activists or religious leaders, working to heal others, we learn a great deal. it stands in stark contrast to violent extremists seek to destroy and never talk about building a community or providing health care with anybody. so we need to recognize that in a world where people of all faiths are mingling like never before, where we a
. for those of you who don't know, max boot is one of america's leading historians in military history, and one of our best historical writers. he is presently in the kilpatrick senior fellow for national security studies at the council on foreign relations. he continues to write extensively in "the weekly standard," the "los angeles times." is a record contributor to "the new york times," "the wall street journal." he's been an editor and a journalist for "the wall street journal" for "christian science monitor." he has written two other major books in the past that are of interest to me, then 17 -- "the savage wars of peace" and "war made new: technology, warfare, and the course of history 1500 to today." max tends to write really big bucks. -- big books. this morning he will talk to us about his latest, "invisible armies." max, turn it over to you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that warm and generous introduction. thank you also for your many decades of service. i see a lot of folks here who are either current active duty or retired military, and i think all of you for your
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
while the nine america extensions and waivers that he has already given to special interests. nothing has been done. let's try something different. medicare, medicaid costs social security all in the same sentence. medicaid is an entitlement. social security and medicare part taxes. we pay for it. and, you know -- >> we did. >> and i have heard comments, if you keep throwing something up against the wall people start believing it. now people believe medicare, to me and say you're a senior citizen, is sam. how come you're take the step from the government. i pay for social security and medicare. and they keep throwing the same thing. [applause] my question to you is what does you go along with in hoss and brandenstein. >> you made a lot of great points. take the mike. go ahead. >> you were quoted as saying to tea party people as the drunken uncle. >> i was referring to republican congressman, nazi party people. a totally, totally out of contracts ." in terms of social security and medicare, no one is able did not pay into it. i did my whole life. most people honestly particularly on me
says america isn't free and runs off to china and russia detail about us is not my idea of a great american patriot. but i think the issue is worth looking at. but i do put a lot of trust in people that defended the united states of america for their entire careers, 30 and 40 years, with distinction and with honor and with valor, put their lives on the line for the country. when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we're not doing this and we're not doing that, we're not doing this, and asking me questions, then i've got to know more than that before cure the rot. fortunately congress will keep looking at this and that's the one good thing that's come out of it. it will continue to be in the press and in the scrutiny. you know, like you, always worry about concentrations of power and individual liberty. i think that's what keeps america free. is that individual citizens are passionate about that and their series about that. at the same time you've got to see the abuses, you've got to know where they are. and i don't think that communism we lost our freedom. if we had we
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
topics. we are certainly very appreciative of his work on those disabled here in america, and what we can do to help those who have challenges ahead of them and how we can integrate them better in to 0 a work force and certainly improve our work force itself. as was mentioned health care remains one of the topics facing our governors across our nation. they are leading the effort in the area of health care cost containment how to encourage our population to take personal responsibility for their health care. become educate on various health care issues. and it's certainly one of the major cost drivers for our state budgets, and we certainly have a lot of federal legislation that is effecting our states and how we run our health care systems. so we're going to hear a time report on that. i should say on health care and have a special session. low we can deal with the health care system and cost containment. and our opening session we're also going to have a session on health and homeland security. and which we'll talk about providing for the health of our veterans. also helping provide bet
. thank you and god bless america. >> i think we go we go inside ? >> we have a signing station set in the air conditioning. >> it's in air conditioning. >> those of us in wool are looking forward to the air conditioning. >> you do that. you're the boss. i'm just the passenger. college is nice, isn't it? >> we will take a moment and get ourselves oriented. we are leaving downtown gettysburg. the train will be moving in a westerly direction. >> does this train go parallel to the route that he came down or hill came down? i think so. you may want to get on and explain that at some point or have bill do it. you do have a narration? you may want to have somebody actually do the narration if that makes sense. >> it was just over that hill where the fighting took place very early in the morning july 1, 1863. >> i think either you or bill should give the narration. bill knows vastly more about the details than i do. but it's your train. i will say something general. >> walk through the park. hi, how are you? good. aren't you wa-good. aren't you warm? >> very warm, sir. >> saw you on bill o
does the program under the prior statute to protect america act look at this exact mechanism of targeting persons overseas and held it against the constitutional challenge. that's why it hasn't been reported a very much but that is an opinion of the court review, arbuckle three that have looked at the program and said that it is unlawful. it's hard for me to imagine an oversight regime that would exceed that. the problem -- >> i don't think you are using that -- >> you have to look at the core to -- court. we were prosecutors and seat to get a first warrant. you go to the judge and present the facts and i am not aware of any country in the world that has anything like the court so you could make it adversarial and slow it down and rest. the problem i think is there's a lack of confidence. it is somewhere below headlights and above right now. >> it's hard for us because in the community we depend on the relationship with the intelligence committee to provide the legitimacy that we need in the program to carry them forward. >> where is the abuse? ayaan understand some people th
, the central social problem in america. >> host: next call for mr. elder, we have about seven minutes left in our program. dennis in sharon, massachusetts. hi, dennis. dennis? >> caller: yes. can you hear me? yes -- >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: okay, great. i'm a great fan of c-span. i watch booktv every weekend. my father was born in 1892, i was his first son. when i was born, he was in 60 years old. he left macon, georgia, as he told we because he saw a black man being burned in the fountain of downtown macon, georgia. the point i would like to make is that i really believe it's, obviously, the father being in the household is a tremendous service to the children, without a doubt. but most importantly i really believe this thing about mind power. having the focus in order to be able to have a discipline to achieve what your goals are in life. the other thing i want to say is that there's a psychological underpinning that i believe hardly anybody talks about in which people aspire to be the anti-antihero. so a lot of this outburst that we see is really someone who really believes
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17

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